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Pwnzor
Posted on Monday, December 25, 2017 - 10:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

OK... it's Christmas, so I've decided to share something with all of you, my BadWeB brothers. Never before have I written this down, it's lived in my head for many years.

What follows is the culmination of countless hours of experimentation, trials and many errors. The benefit of which is now bestowed upon you and immortalized in the Grey-Poupon colored pages of BadWeB.

This is my special recipe for Wild Game chili.


First, prepare your basic chili seasoning, using the following ingredients:

1 cup Chili Powder
1/2 cup Garlic Powder
1/2 cup Cumin
6 TBSP Onion Powder
1/4 cup Oregano
1/4 cup Paprika
2 TBSP Thyme

Mix all these together very well and keep in a jar. You'll have some left over for next time.

1.5 pounds each of Venison, Wild Boar, Chorizo and Beef Top Sirloin
4 large white onions
1 red onion
1 large Anaheim chili
1 serrano chili (2 if you like it hot)
1 large green bell pepper
1 large jalapeno pepper (2 if you like it hot)
6 TBSP minced garlic
4 TBSP masa flour
1 cup dry black beans
1 cup dry northern white or navy beans
1 cup dry pinto beans
1 cup dry red kidney beans
2 regular cans of organic tomato sauce
1 regular can of organic tomato paste
1 regular can of organic diced tomatoes
16 oz of beef broth
1 bottle of dark lager beer (not stout)
1/2 cup of red wine

Go through the beans and get any pebbles out. Soak the beans overnight. Drain the beans and rinse thoroughly. Check again for pebbles and remove any loose skins.

Coarsely chop all the white onions. Finely chop all the chilis/peppers. Mix all the chilis together, but keep the green bell pepper separate.

Venison - trim away all silver skin and sinew. If there is any soft fat, you can leave a little. Cut into 1/2 inch cubes and place into a bowl. Toss with red wine vinegar so it all gets coated. Put in 1/2 chopped white onion and about 1 TBSP of the pepper mixture. Add in 2-3 TBSP of the chili spices, 1 tsp salt, 1 TBSP of the minced garlic and mix it all thoroughly.

Wild Boar - I usually get this pre-ground in sausage casing, so I just squeeze it out of the casing and put in another bowl. Add 1/2 chopped white onion and 1 TBSP of the pepper mixture. Add in 2-3 TBSP of the chili spices, 1 tsp salt, 1 TBSP of the minced garlic and mix it thoroughly.

Chorizo is already ground, so break it up into a bowl. Add 1/2 chopped white onion and 1 TBSP of the pepper mixture, 1 tsp salt, 1 TBSP of the minced garlic and mix thoroughly. NO chili spices on the chorizo!

Top Sirloin - trim off the fat and cut into 1/2 inch cubes, place into another bowl. Add 1/2 chopped white onion and 1 TBSP of the pepper mixture. Add in 2-3 TBSP of the chili spices , 1 tsp salt, 1 TBSP of the minced garlic and mix it thoroughly.

You'll need a large non-stick frying pan and a large pot. Get them both up on the stove.

Get the frying pan hot, add 1 TBSP of oil, and fry up each of the meats in turn. Spread them out in the pan, flatten it out and get them browned up nicely. As they release liquid, add 1 TBSP of masa flour to the pan to thicken it up. Deglaze the pan with just a healthy dash of the beer and stir it in. This will thicken up too. As each meat is finished frying, add it to your large pot.

Next, put 1 TBSP of oil in the pan, and add the rest of your chopped onions & chilis, the green bell pepper and the rest of the minced garlic. Sweat these down but don't fry them all the way.

Add the tomato sauce, tomato paste, diced tomatoes, beans, beef broth and red wine to the pot, while stirring it slowly together. As the ingredients start to marry up, begin tasting it to check for spice level. Add more of the mixed chili spices to taste.

Drink the rest of the beer. Maybe have another. Or some wine. Or both.

Simmer for several hours on very low heat, stirring regularly.

After the chili is ready, finely chop some red onion to put on top.

-------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------

If you like it thinner, you can add more tomato sauce. You can use canned beans, but I find the dry beans hold up better and have more texture. You can swap in any kind of meat you want, more or less peppers or different kinds. I sometimes add some bacon. It's hard to call it Wild Game Chili if at least 2 of the meats are not actually wild game, so check with a local butcher to see what he's got stashed for special customers.
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Teeps
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

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86129squids
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Scanned through that quickly, sounds awesome! We've got to watch Marcia's salt intake very closely, looks like the whole batch uses 1 tsp. Upon a second reading, I'll double check that. Lots of times odd items can unknowingly increase salt levels. I habitually read ingredient and nutrition labels nowadays. Canned veggies are bad culprits.

I took some deviled eggs, my own concoction (with M's input) to work, knowing they were missing something- flavor was great, but... Asked my chef, he handed me his salt grinder.
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Pwnzor
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

It's actually 4 tsp of salt for the whole thing.

It's not a lot of salt for what ends up being 10 pounds of chili... Although there is quite a bit of salt already in the Chorizo.

I have been accused of undersalting food, but I say add it yourself... I love the taste of most things with very little salt, or sometimes none at all.
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Shoggin
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 - 08:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

So hungry......
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Pwnzor
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2017 - 08:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

I'm having a bowl of it right now, with a hunk of corn bread right in the middle.
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86129squids
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 11:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

I'll review that again here in a bit- out of the blue this morning, my sweetie decides she's making a batch of chili today! She's off to the store as I type...

It's gotten dang cold around here, no better time to chili it up! We've already got some great leftover cornbread... might even do nachos later.
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Aesquire
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Squids, America's Test Kitchen often gets complaints they "use salt" as they often brine meats and add salt to recipes. They point out that real food has much less than processed packaged supermarket stuff.

Some frozen Chinese foods have nearly 2000 milligrams per serving. A big pinch in a pot of chili? HAH! Just enjoy. And I say that as one of millions who restricts their salt.

Thanks for the recipe. I'm a Chili Agnostic. Beans/no beans, even white chili and chicken. .... Texan Competition Chili isn't my favorite. I like chunks of onion etc. that is forbidden, but I'll eat it happily and gratefully.

I've even enjoyed Chili on spaghetti in Ohio.
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86129squids
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Patrick, you're spot-on. Almost all packaged foods are way too far gone with salt... READ THE LABELS.

We love America's Test Kitchen. Hoping to buy their cookbook, which should go back to their beginnings. I have a recipe magazine from them, tried several recipes... "Magic Chocolate Flan Upside Down Cake" is a show-stopper!
It's not the same though, without Christopher Kimball.

"Chili Agnostic", +1000. (I LOVE white bean chicken/turkey chili.) We use our own homemade starter, packed with homegrown heirloom tomatoes and peppers, produced and canned every year out of the garden. Hard to beat ours, but Matthew's sounds the tits. Got a good buddy/brother coming to visit tomorrow who hunts, I'll show him that recipe.

By the way, thanks again, Matthew!

(Message edited by 86129squids on December 27, 2017)
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Teeps
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 02:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Aesquire Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 -
I've even enjoyed Chili on spaghetti in Ohio.

Nothing wrong with chili on spaghetti, I eat that.
Not an Ohio thing, it's on some menus in diner places here.
One time I requested a chili size on spaghetti...
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Crusty
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 03:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Cincinnati Chili is not hot. It doesn't taste even remotely like Southwestern style Chili. Still, it's pretty good. Served properly, it's an interestingly flavored beanless chili served on a bed of spaghetti and topped with kidney beans, chopped raw onion and a huge mound of finely shredded cheddar.

My daughter and son-in-law had it for the very first time when they visited me earlier this month and they both really liked it. I would say that Megan was instantly addicted to it.

Matthew's recipe sounds really tasty. I'll have to try it out, one of these days (right after I get the venison and wild boar). I'll probably have to get a much bigger pot than I own at the present time, too.

10 pounds is a LOT of chili!
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Ourdee
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

And a lot more tupperware.
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Pwnzor
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

It takes me the better part of 2 days to make it, so I like to make a lot.

Had burgers for lunch, brought home a bunch of steak fries from the restaurant. Tomorrow I plan to run them through the toaster oven and then cover them with chili, cheese and onions.

I'm really enjoying this "being off work for 10 straight days" thing...
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Aesquire
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 06:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Food saver plastic bags.

Fill with liquids ( chili stew etc ) about 3/4 full and place in freezer between boxes to freeze ( for a handy shape ) upright until frozen then vacuum suck & seal. This makes it easier to seal and prevents vacuuming liquids into pump.

My sister and brother in law make stews & chili for a month before camping 2 weeks. Good cooler and dry ice keeps the sealed slabs safe for more than a week, with hottest years requiring more dry ice.

Generous single serve packages and frozen rice give us great meals for about a week, as we set up camp and the household fills in. Just boil in pot.

They cook a lot and share. Pennsic has very good food vendors but it's easy to get bored with burgers etc. After 2 weeks even favorites like Chinese and bread bowls get old. The food saver lets them do home cooking to delay boredom and saves money for many in camp.

It's usually 3 of us at first then folk trickle in as vacations allow. Setting up many tents & a shower, ( 22x20 common area pavilion and 10x20 kitchen tent and 12x16 shower tent.... not counting pavilions to live in for families and a big canvas sunshade for classes. )
Our master wood worker gives classes each year on medieval wood working. The same company that provides fire wood delivers whole tree logs to camp that end up chairs and cabinets. No electricity. Foot powered lathe & hand planes etc.
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Etennuly
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2017 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

Dammit!!! Y'all be messing with my hungry button!!!!
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Crusty
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2017 - 07:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Custodian/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Custodian/Admin only)

It's cold here. I've decided to make something in a crock pot for dinner tonight. While Matthew's chili sounds really good, I don't have most of the ingredients; like everything but the oregano, tomato paste and garlic powder (and I'm not sure if I have enough of that). However, I was looking through some old e-mails and found this recipe, and I think I'll give it a try. When it's 10 F, anything hot with a bit of liquid that's served in a bowl goes down well.

SLOW COOKER ITALIAN CHICKEN

Serve over pasta or eat just the way it is !! Save the leftovers to use in wraps, YUM!

Ingredients:
1 pound boneless skinless chicken..
1 yellow pepper cut into chunks
1 red pepper cut into chunks
1 onion chopped
3 garlic cloves minced
2 tsp dried basil
1 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp thyme
1 tsp sea salt (optional)
1 14.5 oz can stewed tomatoes

Directions:
Place chicken in bottom of crockpot
Place peppers and onions and garlic on top
Sprinkle the basil, oregano, thyme and sea salt
Pour stewed tomatoes with juice over all
Cook on low for 6 hours


I've never tried this, but it does sound like it might be good and I have all the ingredients.
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